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20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
it the economy tax. it's been crushing. >> question. why did president obama seem thrown off balance? did he underestimate governor romney, pat buchanan? >> he certainly d. governor romney performed better on substance than any candidate in any presidential debate in history. reagan would have beaten him in style in 1980 but on substance i've never seen anybody better prepared than governor romney. he was on of fence. the real question, why did barack obama, the president, do so badly. john, he didn't come prepared for what he found there. he seemed difident, almost disinterested, sour. when they had the two pictures together he was looking down at his notes and the governor was talking to him as if he was lecturing him. some say he's lost his enthusiasm for the battle. he looked like he was weary of the job. i think it may have been something to do with him having been out on the road for a year saying the same thing. he didn't seem to be intellectually stimulated. >> do you think he's overstating that? >> i think mitt romney far exceeded expectations. he turned in a bothow performance. i t
on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philos
% or more. but the campaigns know, in iowa, nothing beats a handshake. since may, the two presidential candidates have held 30 events across the state, with president obama holding three times as many campaign stops as former governor mitt romney. both vice presidential candidates have criss-crossed iowa just in the past few weeks, a sign both parties still think they can win here. president obama has taken a lead in recent polls. still, he is not headed into this election with the same advantage he had in 2008 when he won the state by ten points. two years ago, the republican party chipped away at the democrats lead, and now claim almost 11,000 more registered active voters. mitt romney came in a close second here in the january caucuses, that's four years after he ignored, and lost, the state-- also proof of how campaigning here can make a difference. republicans want to capitalize on that momentum. >> in 2008, the obama campaign had the organizational advantage in iowa. in 2012, republicans have stepped up their game. they had done more by april than john mccain did in iowa by elect
stay. an on the job training program designed to create new jobs. in just a few hours, president obama and governor mitt romney will face off in the first presidential debate. as both candidates fight for votes, each has clear objectives: governor romney needs to rebuild momentum for his campaign, and the president is looking to widen his lead in the polls. to do it, they're each using their own sets of numbers. darren gersh breaks them down, and tells you what you need to know about them. >> reporter: for challenger mitt romney, tonight's debate is his best chance to sell himself to voters who are still undecided. and one way to do that is to focus less on facts and aggressive debate tactics and worry more about coming across as someone voters can be comfortable with. >> i would tell him, don't think too much. be yourself. if you're yourself, you will come off as authentic. authentic is more important than anything else. >> reporter: still, a few numbers might help. starting with $16 trillion, that's the current level of the national debt on president obama's watch. on top of that, pr
in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, and job gains for july and august were revised upward by 86,000 the president touted the numbers in a campaign stop at george mason university in fairfax, virginia. >> now, every month reminds us that we've still got too many of our friends and neighbors who are looking for work. there are too many middle class families that are still struggling to pay the bills. they were struggling long before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points. it's a reminder that this country has come too far to turn back now. >> brown: that was a swipe at republican m
foundation. >> belva: the presidential candidates get back to the campaign trail after their first debate, with governor romney picking up some momentum. president obama returned to the golden state this weekend. there's high interest in several congressional races in the state. will california tip the scales for the control of the u.s. house? governor brown vetoes few of the more than 1,800 bills on his desk, as he presses for support of proposition 30 on the november ballot. and gas jumped as much as 20 cents overnight, with the spike expected to continue. plus, anti-domestic violence leader estra sola on making all violence an issue of global concern, coming up next. >>> good evening, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." on our news panel tonight, dan walters, political column nis for "the sacramento bee." in studio, we have tom vacar, computer editor for ktvu news and josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay asia news group. and joe garofoli, political reporter for "the san francisco chronicle." joe, you were in denver for the first president
that is different from how barack obama would handle a second term. >> these debates can change the dynamics. we've had 10 presidential elections with televised debates. in three of them one candidate went into the first debate leading and another candidate came out of the last debate leading much it's turnedded campaigns in 1960 and 1980 and in 2000. so it can be done but it's a high task for sure. >> remember, we've been campaigning or we haven't been campaigning but the candidates have been campaigning for six months now. >> woodruff: do you agree with susan that a debate can change the trajectory of a race? >> i do. i think it can but it doesn't... it wasn't automatically change a trajectory. something significant has to happen. one of the contestants, one of the debaters has to say something that produces a lot of controversy for two or three days or do something, whether it's a... make a face, look at his watch. something has to happen that the voters look at. it changes how they evaluate the candidate. judy, the way i would put it is everybody needs to take a collective breath after this
would keep the bush tax cuts in place. fewer than half knew that romney and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholarly community. and to our surprise, we consistently find that those who watch debates, regardless of the level of knowledge they come in with, come out with more accurate knowledge as a general group. and they do this because those who haven't paid a great deal of attention have a lot to learn. those of us who'v
the same way he does but they tend not to want to go public. there are two more presidential debates. they will be yet another hoax unless someone puts the question to barack obama and mitt romney, why are we killing kids that don't need to die and then ask it over and again until they don't need to die and then ask it over and again until they have no choice but to go public. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> that's it for this week. on our next edition of "moyers and company" meet the adventure remember who has gone to the top of the earth to take the earth's temperature and some beautiful photographs. from the vanishing areas of north. we're talking about global warming. >> that landscape is gone. it may never be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get mo
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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